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Transport / Mass transit

Uber promotion offers a 20 minute drive with "incredibly hot chicks"

We hate to sound like a broken record, but Uber needs to sort out its marketing. It really needs to sort out its marketing. This week, to top recent winning moves (including practically whooping with joy about the fact that teachers need second incomes and the creepy Uber GO! email signoff they use even when sacking someone), Uber’s Lyon office offered a promotion in which customers could be driven around by models.    

The offer was in conjunction with an app called “Avions de Chasse” (the French term for fighter jets which, the app’s website helpfully explains is “also the colloquial term to designate an incredibly hot chick”). From Buzzfeed, who broke the story yesterday:   

Using the promotion, a user can enter his (presumably) code “UBERAVIONS” in his Uber app and “become the luckiest co-pilot of Lyon,” which basically means that a model will pick you up and drive you around. There’s also the rather icky disclaimer in the post that the offer is valid for a maximum run of 20 minutes.”

And here’s a more positive description of the service from the Avions de Chasse website:    

White papers from our partners

Lucky you! the world’s most beautiful “Avions” are waiting for you on this app. Seat back, relax and let them take you on cloud 9!

In case you were in any doubt as to the potential attractiveness of your driver, the Avions de Chasse website also provides photos:  

Shortly after Buzzfeed ran its initial story, Uber’s post offering the promotion was removed. They released the following statement to the Huffington Post:   

We have decided to cancel the operation immediately, not having clearly assessed the situation, we sincerely apologize to the people who might have been offended.

So it’s back to the drawing board for the marketing department. Can they top their partnership with a company whose tagline is the simple, yet effective, “Sexy Girls”? Only time will tell. 
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