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Transport / Mass transit

This map of London's tube shows disused stations, track layout and more

It’s a scary, scary world out there. Looming crisis in North Korea. Donald Trump gaining in the polls. David Cameron leaving us all alone.

So what you need, to gladden the heart and life the soul, is clearly a new tube map.

Actually, this one isn’t really new: it’s dated 2009, and emerged from a Freedom of Information request sent in 2013. But it’s

  1. geographically accurate,
  2. fascinatingly detailed, and
  3. genuinely interesting and informative if you’re a nerd, which – let’s be honest – you are.

The FOI request asked for a “detailed track and signalling map of the Underground“. What it uncovered is this:

Click to expand.

Which doesn’t show signalling, but you can’t have everything.

The map shows the only part of the Victoria line that’s above ground, the Northumberland Park depot….

Click to expand.

…and that it’s theoretically possible to divert Piccadilly line trains to Walthamstow:

Click to expand.

It shows that the branch to Chesham is single track:

Click to expand.

It shows that the Piccadilly and District lines share tracks between Acton Town and Ealing Common.

Click to expand.

Zoom into the central London section and you can see a whole range of features: disused tube stations like Down Street and City Road; the Kennington loop, which allows trains to reverse and head north again; the fact the Waterloo & City line passes quite close to Blackfriars, should anyone feel the need to build a station there…

Click to expand.

Then there’s this nightmare of Northern line tracks around Camden:

Click to expand.

No wonder they want to split the line.

I’m going to stop here because if I don’t I’ll keep banging on all day – but there are no doubt all sorts of other Easter Eggs on here for the discerning train nerd. Do tweet us your favourites.

Jonn Elledge is the editor of CityMetric. He is on Twitter, far too much, as @jonnelledge.

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