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Transport / Mass transit

A city in Ohio is installing special purple parking spaces for wounded veterans

It’s Remembrance Day (or Veterans’ Day, in the US), which means that all over the world, we’re honouring the armed forces – whether that be through music, a minute’s silence, listening to their stories, wearing red paper flowers on our lapels, or lambasting a nice old man for not bowing quite low enough during a remembrance ceremony. 

In the face of all this remembrance, the municipality of Warren, Ohio has taken a somewhat more practical approach. Earlier this month, it unveiled the first of what will be a series of parking spaces for wounded veterans. This one was outside the Municipal Justice Building, and consisted of a bright purple parking space (shown above). There’s also a purple plaque, explaining the parking’s symbolism:

Image: screenshot of WKBN video

In a way, this is a largely symbolic gesture: many veterans handicapped during service could, of course, use standard disabled parking spots. These special spots – with their bright purple markings and plaque  seem more like an attempt to honour the veterans and draw public attention to their sacrifice. The purple colour and image on the plaque refer to the Purple Heart, a medal awarded to soldiers killed or injured during service. 

Here are some purple-clad veterans at the space’s unveiling:

Image: screenshot of WKBN video

Warren’s public transport network is limited to a couple of buses, so this gesture must be particularly welcome for local ex-servicemen and women. 

Herman Breuer, head of the local veterans’ network, told WKBN news that he was delighted by the gesture:

For the city to recognize veterans by putting out a parking spot for the combat wounded, you know, combat wounded, they should hold a special place in everyone’s heart. 

They spilled blood for our country.

Eventually, the city intends to install similar parking spaces outside all municipal buildings. 


 
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